Tag: self-promotion

Moderating my first Twitter Chat

I was very slow to embrace Twitter and have only had an account since 2013. One of the interesting things about blogging is that you can never really predict when one of your posts will resonate with someone and what the outcome of it will be. Last week I wrote a blog post reflecting on the experience of live tweeting a research talk for the first time. The post caught the attention of our university’s Knowledge Mobilization officer and through that connection I was invited to moderate my first twitter chat at #KMbChat. The topic was my blog post which was very flattering.

The twitter chat took place yesterday and will be archived here . I wasn’t sure what to expect since it was my first time participating in a twitter chat, let alone hosting one! I can happily report that it was an awesome experience and that the community was fantastic and very welcoming. I learned a lot from the experience itself as well as from the content of our discussion.

My plan is to use several of the topics that came up for discussion in the twitter chat as subjects of blog posts over the next few weeks. Based on my experience yesterday, I can verify that Twitter chats are very useful from a professional standpoint and I’ll be actively looking to participate in more of them in the future.

Advertisements

Self-Promotion as a Female Scientist

Over at the Dynamic Ecology blog there’s an interesting poll and commentary on the topic of self-promotion in science. Many of us in science are introverts. Self-promotion is therefore unnatural and uncomfortable. In conversations that I’ve had with scientists over the years it seems that biologists are quite divided on whether self-promotion is a good or bad thing. Regardless of how you feel about it from a personal or ethical standpoint, I would make the argument that self-promotion in science is necessary in today’s funding climate. Some trainees and early researchers that I’ve talked to recently still seem to harbour the mistaken belief that if you publish well and do good science, your science will speak for itself, and the meritocracy of science will see fit to reward you. I think that this is a dangerous fallacy that has hurt many a career. Similar to networking, it seems that many scientists see self-promotion as dirty or unseemly behaviour. As universities continue to realize the importance of community engagement and knowledge mobilization in recruitment and advancement the pressure on scientists to self-promote will only increase. Whether you agree with this or not, in order to survive and thrive, you’ll need to learn how to promote yourself, your trainees, and your work.

 

I can reveal the importance of self-promotion in science by sharing a personal anecdote. When I was a Ph.D. student I made a discovery that was a big deal in my field of research; I discovered a new bio-energetic pathway in animals. I wanted to share my results with animal biologists and I felt that the best way to do this was to present my results as a talk at the annual meeting of the Canadian Society of Zoologists (CSZ). I put together the best talk that I could, wrote an effective abstract, and went to register for the conference. Going to this conference was a big deal for me because most of the work that I had been doing was in plant biology; I had only recently started working in an animal system. I therefore had a gigantic case of imposter syndrome. Each year the CSZ holds a competition for the best student presentation delivered at the annual meeting, but in order to compete you need to self-nominate by ticking a box during registration. I did not tick the box. After all, who was I but a plant biologist invading the domain of animal biologists? Long story short- I gave an amazing talk that likely would have won me the award, but I had taken myself out of the running. It was an epic fail in self-promotion. The next year I put my hat in the ring and won the honourable mention for the award. It was an important lesson to learn early in my career.

 

I am also conscious of the fact that some of my hang-ups about self-promotion are due to the fact that I’m a woman. I’ve been socialized to keep my head down, do my best, and hope that I’ll be duly rewarded. It’s taken a lot of work to get to the point of realizing that I need to toot my own horn and be proactive about telling others about my research. I can’t afford not to.