Tag: blogging

Blogs that I read

One of the great advantages to using social media (e.g. blogging, Twitter) is the wonderful people that you can meet and the impressive knowledge that you can acquire in a short period of time. Before I began blogging I lurked for a long time on-line in order to examine the landscape and get a feel for how bloggers go about blogging and how scientists were using Twitter. I’m still learning, but for those of you who are new to the on-line world, or are looking for new blogs to read I thought that I’d share links to the blogs that I read regularly. I list them below in no particular order.

  1. Apple Pie and the Universe

I’ve been reading this blog for several years. The writer is a female astrophysicist who is balancing a professional career with family. She has recently gone back to school to become a teacher and has a strong interest in public science outreach.

  1. Ask a Manager

Alison Green dispenses straight shooting advice on how to manage people. I’ve found her blog very helpful for providing perspective on my role as a professor managing my lab and a group of trainees. The scenarios presented here are sometimes shocking, but the advice is solid.

  1. Beyond Managing

Melanie recently left a job in the information technology sector and has become an entrepreneur. She often posts insightful pieces on productivity, managing people, and women in science.

  1. Dynamic Ecology

I am not an ecologist, but I enjoy most of the posts on this site by Brian, Meg, and Jeremy.

  1. Eat, Read, Science.

Betty posts great summaries of recent, cool science papers! Always an interesting read.

  1. Female Science Professor

This blog was recently referred to as the “gateway” science blog for many women in science that led them into the blogosphere or encouraged them to start blogging themselves.

  1. The Simple Dollar

Trent provides simple ideas for how to manage your money and live a frugal lifestyle without turning into a humourless hermit.

  1. Get a Life Ph.D.

Tanya provides useful advice and perspective for graduate students and those starting out on the tenure track.

  1. Small Pond Science

Terry et al. talk about what it’s like to do research at a smaller, teaching focussed institution. The “Recommended Reads” posts are awesome!

  1. Tenure, She Wrote

A fairly new blog that covers a wide array of topics in frank and honest voices from multiple contributors.

  1. Isis the Scientist

This was one of the first blogs that I read that really spoke to me as a woman in science. Dr. Isis tells it like it is, but offers effective strategies for real world scenarios.

What blogs do you like to read as a scientist? Leave links in the comments below.

Advertisements

Moderating my first Twitter Chat

I was very slow to embrace Twitter and have only had an account since 2013. One of the interesting things about blogging is that you can never really predict when one of your posts will resonate with someone and what the outcome of it will be. Last week I wrote a blog post reflecting on the experience of live tweeting a research talk for the first time. The post caught the attention of our university’s Knowledge Mobilization officer and through that connection I was invited to moderate my first twitter chat at #KMbChat. The topic was my blog post which was very flattering.

The twitter chat took place yesterday and will be archived here . I wasn’t sure what to expect since it was my first time participating in a twitter chat, let alone hosting one! I can happily report that it was an awesome experience and that the community was fantastic and very welcoming. I learned a lot from the experience itself as well as from the content of our discussion.

My plan is to use several of the topics that came up for discussion in the twitter chat as subjects of blog posts over the next few weeks. Based on my experience yesterday, I can verify that Twitter chats are very useful from a professional standpoint and I’ll be actively looking to participate in more of them in the future.

Don’t feed the trolls

I think that I was first introduced to trolls in the story of the Three Billy Goats Gruff . In children’s stories the troll is always an ugly character who is up to no good. I particularly liked the treatment of trolls in the film Willow  and the way that they climbed up walls. The next time that I thought about trolls was when my kids were younger and we went through a phase when we all watched a lot of Dora the Explorer . This troll wasn’t particularly threatening, but you did have to solve his riddle if you wanted to cross the bridge. He had a theme song that easily became an ear worm in our house. Recently my husband and I started watching previous seasons of the TV show Once Upon a Time  and there was one episode containing trolls on a bridge.

Last weekend I had an experience with a real-life troll. I am talking about the internet variety. I’ve been blogging for a little over a year now and consider myself fortunate that I haven’t had to interact with any trolls. I feel that way given the frightening amount of trolling that is directed towards women on the internet. I usually don’t check my email over the weekend, but last Sunday afternoon I did. Sitting in my inbox was an email from a person who I didn’t recognize, but I get lots of emails from students looking to do graduate work with me so that wasn’t particularly unusual. Unfortunately the contents of the email were not harmless and were of a sexually harassing nature. This person had taken the trouble to learn some personal pieces of information about me which was very disturbing and signed off the email as a secret admirer. It was thoroughly creepy, distracting, and made me feel very unsafe. It is also unwanted and unwarranted.

I accept that as part of my job as a professor that I will receive my share of unpleasant emails such as those that convey bad news about grants, complaints from students that I teach about my evaluations of their work, or disagreements with colleagues about how to solve problems. In my naïveté I never thought that I would be subject to anonymous sexual harassment by email. I’m now wondering how many of my colleagues have had to deal with something similar, but haven’t said anything out of fear, shame, or bewilderment. Sometimes ignorance really is bliss. I expect that I am not the only person to have had this experience, but I think that it’s important to talk about it and not sweep it under the rug.

I’d appreciate hearing from others who have had this experience and how they dealt with it.

Describing Social Media Activities in Promotion Packages

This past summer I spent a great deal of time in July and August putting together my tenure package. My view of tenure packages are that they are very individualized documents and this made it challenging to put the document together. It was also very rewarding when I completed the process and was a great opportunity for self-reflection. Recently, both Terry McGlynn and Jeremy Fox have discussed how they have handled their blogging activities in promotion packages. When I was putting my tenure package together it was clear that biologists who study ecology and/or evolution seem to be much more social media savvy compared to biochemists and physiologists. I found little advice on including social media activities in tenure packages and what I did find was posted by scholars in social sciences and humanities. I thought that I’d offer my perspective as an early career scientist who decided to include my social media activities in my tenure package.

At my institution we are evaluated for tenure on the basis of scholarship, teaching, and service. I have been blogging and using Twitter for about 1 year and I wanted to capture these activities somewhere in my tenure package. I consider the attitudes of my colleagues and my institution to be progressive and felt that those who would be evaluating my tenure package would be amenable to hearing about how I was using social media as a scientist.

In November 2013 I attended a workshop that directly addressed the role that social media could play in increasing your scientific profile. At that time I had a Linkedin page and had a ResearchGate profile. I was making an effort to keep my lab webpage up to date. We have a Knowledge Mobilization Officer at my university and she convinced me that I should step up my game. My first step was to open a Twitter account. I had resisted doing this as I wasn’t sure what kind of value it would offer. In the past year I have found Twitter to be useful in the following ways:
1) It has helped me find other female early career researchers and allies online and has made me feel part of a broader community.
2) It has provided advice and guidance on how to navigate the tenure-track.
3) It has given me some great ideas for teaching and active learning exercises to try in the classroom.
4) It has made me more aware of the challenges facing various “outsiders” in science and the role that I can play in challenging and ending inequities.
5) It has allowed me to increase my blog readership.

For several months I had also been toying around with the idea of blogging about being a research scientist. I had already decided that I wasn’t going to blog directly about my specific research field, but that I had a lot that I wanted to say about the actual process of doing scientific research and the “unwritten rules” or “Hidden Curriculum” of being a biologist. My focus would be on transferrable skills and to look at science through the eyes of a female early researcher on the tenure-track.

In my tenure package I made an argument that part of my scholarship was devoted to issues involving women in science and the professionalization of scientists. In addition to my social media activities, I’ve also been offering workshops on these topics as a post-doc and faculty member at my institutions and national conferences. While it is not my primary research focus, it is very much a large part of my scholarly identity and that is the case that I presented in my tenure package. The workshops and presentations at scholarly conferences served as quantifiable data that I could use to support my argument. I also used altmetrics such as the number of blog and Twitter posts, number of page views, visitors from various countries, number of retweets of my tweets, etc. as data to support my impact through my blogging activities. I also included hard copies of each of my blog posts in my tenure package.

I have been blogging for 1 year and have really enjoyed it so far. I have been approached by several graduate students, post-docs, and faculty who have told me that they read my blog and find it useful or interesting. That is very satisfying to hear and demonstrates that I have something valuable to add to the scientific enterprise and online conversations.

Introducing a Blogging Assignment into a Graduate Course

This term I am teaching a graduate course on Ecological Physiology. When I was designing the course I wanted to provide the students with an opportunity to write about science for a more general audience. At the same time, I had recently started blogging and using Twitter and was starting to see the usefulness of these forms of communication and felt strongly that these are practical skills that should be taught to graduate students within the curriculum. I therefore thought that I’d like to add an assignment to my course that required my students to write a blog post.

The assignment requires my students to select a recent scientific paper (less than 5 months since publication) that they find interesting and that they believe would make an interesting blog post. We’ve had several meetings to discuss their papers and their approach to writing and publicizing their blog post. Their performance will be evaluated on the content of their post (e.g. writing style, writing effectiveness, etc.) and the popularity of their post as measured by page views.

This Friday I will feature two guest blog posts by my students on the research papers that they have selected. As this is the first time using this assignment I expect that I and the students will learn a great deal and I look forward to sharing the results of this experiment!