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DoctorAl Digest #26

Word from a psychologist that the productivity advice to “Eat your frog” first thing in the morning doesn’t match well with how human brains actually function.

An amusing piece from the journal Inorganic Chemistry on “The Five Stages of Rejection” when it comes to submitting a journal manuscript for peer-reviewed publication.

Equity, inclusion, and diversity requires that work must be assigned fairly. A great article in Harvard Business Review.

The Special Challenges of Being Both a Scientist and a Mom

Modest Advice for New Graduate Students

 

 

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Angry Women

Angry Women

angry woman

Today is International Women’s Day and it seems timely to publish something about a topic that I’ve been wrestling with all of my life, but that I’ve been thinking about deeply for a few weeks. Doing science as a woman is tricky business due to the societal and cultural constraints on what constitutes appropriate and professional behaviour in academic settings. These rules aren’t written down anywhere and often the only way that you find out that you’ve violated them is by being told (explicitly or implicitly) that you’ve behaved inappropriately.

I’d like to start by challenging these rules and to suggest that they are not correct. I believe that there are many ways to be a scientist and to do science and that showing strong emotions can be appropriate and professional. We are people first and scientists second. Emotions are not a minor inconvenience that should be supressed at every turn; they often serve as warnings that something is not right with our world.

I’d also like to unpack the gendered lenses that we all use to view the emotions of others. Single emotions do not belong to only one gender. Women are not the only people who experience sadness; men are not the only people who experience joy. The scientific enterprise is full of moments of various emotions, and I would argue that these emotions are not good or bad, appropriate or inappropriate, professional or unprofessional.

I think what matters is not so much the emotions themselves, but what we choose to do in response to them. I have also recently realized that I am not responsible for managing the emotions of other people and I refuse to bear that burden any longer.

Many times in my career I have been an angry woman. This is natural and fine. It is not an inherently bad thing that I need to be ashamed of. I am allowed to feel, experience, and embrace my anger. That anger has allowed me to do great things in the face of adversity. Anger has permitted me to speak my truths. Anger has enabled me to right some wrongs and to help other people when I have identified injustice and discrimination. If I’m angry, believe that I have good reasons for being so.

I do not need to be tone-policed, mansplained, put in my place, given “friendly” career advice, or concern trolled. I am not in fact uppity, bitter, man-hating, or need to be told I can catch more flies with honey. I’m good.

Doctor Al Digest #22

A great post over at the Conditionally Accepted blog entitled “Latinxs in Academe: Rage about “Diversity Work that effectively articulates the anger that is generated and internalized when one is assumed and expected to speak for an entire group.

This beautiful piece by Ta-Nehisi Coates is a must read. I am in awe of this man’s ability to use English prose. The lovely turns of phrase in this piece are surprising given its subject matter. I read it several weeks ago and it’s haunted me ever since.

I had previously avoided reading anything authored by Margaret Wente on purpose. Her column on Sept. 19, 2017 about students with disabilities was ignorant, unkind, and poorly researched. I won’t do it the dignity of linking to it here. I’ll warn you not to read the comments either; most of them are equally gross and lacking in empathy.

 

Book Review-The Martian by Andy Weir

My husband read this book last year and was raving about it, but I didn’t get around to reading it until this week. The book is excellent and very engaging! It tells the tale of an astronaut stranded on Mars when his crewmates leave him behind after an accident because they believe him to be dead. The writing style is very different in that it changes between the first and third person throughout the novel. During portions of the book narrated by the astronaut Mark it is written in the first person as a personal log, but for scenes involving NASA headquarters on Earth or the other astronauts it is written in the third person.

Two things that I really liked about the book is that it manages to make science interesting and I think that this would be the case even if I wasn’t a biologist. I love fiction books that make science accessible for everyone. The second thing that makes this a great book is that there were several points when I laughed out loud while reading it!

This book is a great read and I hope that the author will write more books in the future.

 

A New Hope

This is not a post about Star Wars; sorry if you saw the title and came here expecting something else. It is instead how I felt last night once I had a chance to look at the new cabinet selected by our Prime Minister (PM).

The first thing that struck me is that the cabinet and the PM arrived together on a bus and that members of the public were welcomed to the grounds of Rideau Hall to take part in the event. This is a great change from the closed door policy of the previous government and the previous method of having each minister arrive separately. These new ministers look happy to be there. I was also pleased to see that the PM included his partner and his children in the events of the day. I have hope that this will be a functional cabinet where ministers are free to be themselves and express their opinions.

The second reason that I have hope is because of this photo.

new cabinet image

Image copyright CBC

This is an awesome photo! This photo matches what I think of when I think about being Canadian. People who have different genders, gender identities, sexuality, ancestry, religion, personalities, regional affiliations, experiences, life realities, challenges, and motivations. It is so wonderful to see people who look like me in this photo; it makes me feel like I belong in this country and that a version of my voice will be heard in Parliament.

Several other things that give me hope…

We have a Minister of Innovation, Science, and Economic Development. This highlights the key role that science and technology play in a financially successful Canada.

But wait! There’s more! We have family doctor who is the new Minister of Health. We have a Minister for the Status of Women!! We have a Minister of Environment and Climate Change!!!! We have a newly created position of Science Minister!!! All of these portfolios are held by individuals who have impressive credentials, life experiences, and the ability to get things done. They are all women. We have for the first time in this country a cabinet with a 50:50 sex ratio that is truly reflective of the Canadian population.

Today, I am very proud to be Canadian.

An excellent start Mr. Trudeau!

Jill of All Trades and Master of None?

I have a confession to make. I am a scientific wanderer. I haven’t wandered as much as Darwin, both in terms of his areas of interest and his physical journeys, but I am easily distracted by new and shiny ideas.

My undergraduate and M.Sc. thesis projects were spent looking at the phosphate-starvation response in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the influence of the commercial fungicide phosphite on those responses. I learned sterile technique, how to grow yeast strains and supplement media, how to do enzyme assays and kinetics, and gained a general understanding of 31P NMR. I did all of this in a plant biochemistry and metabolism lab and was the odd person who worked on yeast.

For my Ph.D., I moved to a plant physiology lab where I learned molecular biology, how to transform tobacco plants using Agrobacterium, how to grow diatoms and cyanobacteria, mitochondrial isolation techniques, SDS-PAGE, Western blotting, and a smattering of bioinformatics. Mid-way through my degree I switched gears a bit and started working with oysters. I gained a huge appreciation for the theory of serial endosymbiosis and the diversity of life forms on the planet. I studied the alternative oxidase of mitochondria, but also did some work on the plastoquinol terminal oxidase of chloroplasts.

My post-doc took place in an animal comparative physiology and biochemistry lab where I continued to practice my skills in molecular biology, bioinformatics, mitochondrial isolations, and picked up a better understanding of respirometry. I mostly studied oysters, but also worked with tissues from wide variety of other animals including nematodes, sea urchins, lamprey, hagfish, scallops and also worked on non-flowering plants including pines, spruces, ginko, etc. I also developed a heterologous yeast expression system at the end of my post-doc. I continued to work on AOX and PTOX, but in a new set of organisms.

Since starting my faculty appointment, my students and I have worked with yeast, moss, bacteria, tobacco, and a copepod. I continue to use a variety of techniques in the lab and am contemplating using CRISPR in the near future. Most of the time I think that having such a varied background has been a huge advantage to my career and for the science that I do. I attend both animal and plant science conferences and am thinking about adding bacterial meetings to the mix. Every once and a while my imposter syndrome gets the better of me and I envy my colleagues who work on a single model organism, pursue a very focused set of research questions, or use tried and tested techniques. My diversity of interests makes it difficult to write focused grant applications, but it allows me to qualify for a wider range of funding opportunities. I sometimes feel that I’m lurching around in the dark, but this approach has allowed me to make some significant contributions to my research field.

Are you a Jill or Jack of all trades? Or a master or mistress of a particular type of science?

What it’s really like to be a pregnant grad student

Meg over at Dynamic Ecology has a great post up about “Sciencing during the first trimester”. First of all let me say that I love the term “sciencing”; it’s awesome! It’s a pretty hot topic as seen from the comments and I think it’s because there isn’t an obvious forum in which to discuss these topics and based on my experiences pregnant graduate students are a rare breed. I wanted to share my story in light of Meg’s post and the comments that it has generated.

I have two children; my son is 12 and my daughter is almost 8. I became pregnant with my son a year and a half into my Ph.D. program on purpose. I say on purpose because one of the more shocking things that happened to me during my first pregnancy as a graduate student was the number of people who seemed to think that it was an accidental pregnancy. The idea that a graduate student would choose to become pregnant during graduate school was pretty racy back then I guess; hopefully this is starting to change. I found out in February 2012 that I was pregnant and it is easily one of the most amazing and terrifying moments of my life. My first trimester was not very fun. Every morning like clockwork I was dry heaving at 7:30 a.m. and I had fairly constant nausea during the day. Eating small meals very frequently is excellent advice. During this time I was performing tissue dissections on oysters for my research project. The combination of the smell of oyster guts and pregnancy nausea was epic!

My husband and I decided not to tell anyone about the pregnancy until after the first trimester due to concerns about miscarriage. After I passed the three month mark I needed to decide who else needed to know and when I needed to disclose that I was pregnant. I decided to tell my supervisor just after the first trimester as a courtesy so that we could plan for my parental leave to minimize my absence from the lab. I worried and stressed about having that conversation for weeks. It doesn’t matter how well you think you know your supervisor and how you think that they’ll react to your news. All of us have heard stories about horrible PIs who eject pregnant graduate students and post-docs from their labs or who write them off once they become pregnant. Fortunately, although my supervisor was very surprised by my announcement, he was very supportive throughout my pregnancy and maternity leave. I was very fortunate to have in my department a graduate student who had recently had a child and a faculty member who was pregnant at the same time that I was. These women offered great advice and support during a time that was pretty alienating. At that time, nothing screamed “other” in academic science like a huge, swollen, pregnancy belly. I heard through the grapevine that other faculty members felt sorry for my PI as they viewed my pregnancy as evidence that I wasn’t serious about science. I expect that many members of the academy still think that way, even if they don’t verbalize it. Being pregnant as a graduate student was good from the perspective that I had a lot of flexibility in my schedule and that youth was on my side. I look at my fellow female faculty members who are pregnant or new mothers in awe as I cannot imagine doing this at my current age while just starting out on the tenure track. I worked in the lab throughout my pregnancy and continued to work with biohazards, chemicals, and radiation during this time. I took the usual safety precautions and wore a radiation counter ring on my hand during this period of time. Once the nausea went away during the second trimester, the biggest challenges were feeling tired, heartburn, carrying around an extra 40 pounds, and the swelling of various body parts. I went into labour 2 hours after TAing a lab and it took my son a few days to make an appearance. Having him is by far the most mentally and physically challenging thing that I have ever done. This helps to put grant writing, manuscript writing, and conference presentations into perspective.

The first trimester of my second pregnancy was rougher than the first. I came home from the lab early one afternoon because I wasn’t feeling well and the nausea hit like a tidal wave. I spent the rest of the afternoon and the evening throwing up very violently. By the time it was done the force of my puking had ruptured several blood vessels in one eye. It was not a good look and there was no way that I could hide it. When I went back into work the next day I told all of my lab mates and my supervisor that I was pregnant. My second pregnancy forced me to disclose my condition much earlier than I wanted to and I ended up taking Diclectin until part way through my second trimester in an attempt to control the vomiting and nausea. The rest of my symptoms were similar to my first pregnancy and there was some comfort in knowing what to expect the second time around. I went into labour 2 weeks after defending my Ph.D. thesis and my daughter arrived in 4 hours start to finish.

Being pregnant as a graduate student taught me many things. Below I’ve listed the ones that are most important.

  • Know and accept your limitations. You can’t do it all and that’s o.k. Do your best. Great days, good days, bad days, and awful days will all average out. Work, sleep, and eat. You are growing a whole new person inside of you; that SDS-PAGE gel will wait.
  • Know your rights and the social supports and programs available to you. Be your own advocate and find allies. Ask for help when you need it; this is not a sign of weakness.
  • Being organized is great and it’s excellent to plan ahead, but you have to roll with the punches. Expect the unexpected. Your best laid plans will go up in flames, so it’s useful to have a Plan B, Plan C, and…you get the idea.
  • Mind the gap. Pregnancy will impact your productivity and so will raising small children. I managed to publish while pregnant and again soon after returning from maternity leave, so there is no gap in my CV.
  • Enjoy your pregnancy and your baby. You will feel guilty. Lock your guilt in a closet and throw away the key.