Month: May 2016

Book Review: Lab Girl by Hope Jahren

Hope Jahren’s book has been on my “to read” list since it came out. Many of her blog posts have really resonated with me as a woman in science. Several high profile reviews have been very positive and so I placed it on reserve at my local library.

Overall, I liked the book. It’s mostly a biography that covers the lives of Hope, and her partner in lab crime, Bill. The biographical bits are interspersed with quick vignettes that talk about major aspects of plant biology in a very relatable way. Readers who are not biologists will come away having gained some knowledge about how scientists think and operate and that is a good thing. I really enjoyed the beginning of the book, disliked the middle of the book, and thought that the reflections in the latter half of the book were poignant. I was especially touched by her descriptions of her experiences as a woman in science, her mental illness, and motherhood.

One major thing that I didn’t like about this book is that I found myself being very judgemental about several incidents described its pages. This likely says more about me as a reader, than it does about the author. One area that is treated very cavalierly in the book is lab and field safety. She describes a glass explosion incident in the lab and two car crashes (one very severe) that all involved trainees in an off-hand manner that I found disturbing and appalling. This may be how she has chosen to deal with what are traumatic events, but it leaves the reader feeling that scientists operate as cowboys who are answerable to no one. She also describes a few hazing rituals that she’s used on trainees in her laboratory to separate the wheat from the chaff which rubbed me the wrong way. A lot of time is spent referring to her obsessive and excessive hours spent in the lab. My personal feeling is that maintaining those kind of hours is unsustainable and unsafe and just serves to reinforce the masochistic aspects of science.

She peels back some of the mystery of what it means to be a scientist, warts and all, and perhaps that is what made me so uncomfortable with the middle of the book. She pulls no punches and this is a very honest book based on her experiences as a scientist. Many observations in the book made me laugh out loud, and some stories made me tear up. Books should make you feel and think and in this the author has succeeded.

I recommend reading this book to scientists and non-scientists alike. I think that it has something for everyone.