Using Games in the Classroom

At the beginning of April I went to an excellent workshop facilitated by Dr. Scott Nicholson called “Games Beyond Screens in the Classroom”. Scott is the director of the Brantford Games Network game lab and teaches and chairs the program in the Bachelor of Fine and Applied Arts in Game Design and Development. The program has been wildly successful and they are looking to hire another faculty member who focuses on digital game design and project management.

Scott took us through several games during the course of the workshop and each had elements that I could easily see incorporating into my classrooms. He made the important point that after you run a game you always have to debrief. There is no point in running an activity without exploring how it made you feel, what was experienced, how it relates to your world, how you could see incorporating it into your space, and learning from the experiences of other people. Failing to debrief after a game is a very common error.

The other take-home from the workshop is that games do not have to be fun and they do not have to be fair. You are perfectly within your rights to manipulate the game in order to achieve the learning outcomes that you’d like for your students. This was a bit of a surprise for me, but having seen it in action at the workshop, I can see how it would work.

This past Monday I shared what I had learned at the workshop with some colleagues who are members of our SCAFFOLD (Student-Centred Active Flexible Face-to-Face Online Learning Discussions) community of practice. At our next meeting in May we’ll be discussing how to bring fun into our classrooms.

Do you run any games in your classrooms in order to facilitate learning? What has worked and what has been a disaster?

 

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One thought on “Using Games in the Classroom

  1. I’ve used games in my classroom and it always goes over well! I used Kahoot! to review the previous weeks’ quiz in my second year course (they have quizzes every week) and I’ve used puzzles in my college math class for teamwork activities. I’ve used a large variety of games in my high school classes, and want to incorporate those more into post-secondary classrooms.

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