The Top 10 Things I Learned in Graduate School

1. How to “Manage Up”.

Graduate school involves working with a supervisor/advisor and a large number of other researchers (e.g. fellow grad students, committee members, research technicians, etc.). In order to complete your research, you need to secure the help of all of these people and frankly you will not be their top priority. There is a skill in getting people to do what you need them to do without being demanding, rude, or ungrateful.

2. Strive for Good Enough.

Perfection is the enemy of getting things done. Aim to do your best, but understand that sometimes your research products and outcomes will not be perfect. It is better to have a strong finished thesis than an unfinished perfect thesis.

3. You need a strong support network.

This includes people who will support you both personally and professionally. They are rooting for your success and want you to finish your degree. They will celebrate your successes and will help lift you up when things are not going your way. Do not take these people for granted.

4. Leaving graduate school is not failure.

Graduate school isn’t for everyone, and if it isn’t for you, then is it better to realize that early on and make a change. It is not worth staying in a situation that is making you miserable for an academic degree. Leaving academia does not make you a traitor.

5. A few hours in the library/reading the literature can save you months in the lab.

Don’t reinvent the wheel. Science moves forward on the results of the people who have come before you. Heed their wisdom.

6. Be observant.

This goes for experiments in the lab as well as watching the people in your department. If something seems unusual or strange it is often an excellent opportunity to make a new discovery about the world or yourself.

7. Don’t accept paradigms and rules blindly.

It is good to think for yourself and challenge the status quo. If you would like to one day be an independent thinker and come up with your own ideas, you will need to get comfortable with getting outside of your comfort zone.

8. Science is not the only important aspect of your life.

Work on constructing an identity that does not include being a scientist. You will thank yourself later and it will make you a much more resilient and happier person. It is important to have friends, family, hobbies, sports, etc. that you enjoy.

9. Ask for help when you need it.

There is no shame in asking for help. Spend some time on your own trying to come up with a logical solution to your problems and if you are still stuck then get some assistance.

10. Have multiple mentors.

Asking for and receiving advice is not one stop shopping. It’s better to have multiple people that you can approach and rely on in order to get different perspectives.

 

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