Jill of All Trades and Master of None?

I have a confession to make. I am a scientific wanderer. I haven’t wandered as much as Darwin, both in terms of his areas of interest and his physical journeys, but I am easily distracted by new and shiny ideas.

My undergraduate and M.Sc. thesis projects were spent looking at the phosphate-starvation response in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the influence of the commercial fungicide phosphite on those responses. I learned sterile technique, how to grow yeast strains and supplement media, how to do enzyme assays and kinetics, and gained a general understanding of 31P NMR. I did all of this in a plant biochemistry and metabolism lab and was the odd person who worked on yeast.

For my Ph.D., I moved to a plant physiology lab where I learned molecular biology, how to transform tobacco plants using Agrobacterium, how to grow diatoms and cyanobacteria, mitochondrial isolation techniques, SDS-PAGE, Western blotting, and a smattering of bioinformatics. Mid-way through my degree I switched gears a bit and started working with oysters. I gained a huge appreciation for the theory of serial endosymbiosis and the diversity of life forms on the planet. I studied the alternative oxidase of mitochondria, but also did some work on the plastoquinol terminal oxidase of chloroplasts.

My post-doc took place in an animal comparative physiology and biochemistry lab where I continued to practice my skills in molecular biology, bioinformatics, mitochondrial isolations, and picked up a better understanding of respirometry. I mostly studied oysters, but also worked with tissues from wide variety of other animals including nematodes, sea urchins, lamprey, hagfish, scallops and also worked on non-flowering plants including pines, spruces, ginko, etc. I also developed a heterologous yeast expression system at the end of my post-doc. I continued to work on AOX and PTOX, but in a new set of organisms.

Since starting my faculty appointment, my students and I have worked with yeast, moss, bacteria, tobacco, and a copepod. I continue to use a variety of techniques in the lab and am contemplating using CRISPR in the near future. Most of the time I think that having such a varied background has been a huge advantage to my career and for the science that I do. I attend both animal and plant science conferences and am thinking about adding bacterial meetings to the mix. Every once and a while my imposter syndrome gets the better of me and I envy my colleagues who work on a single model organism, pursue a very focused set of research questions, or use tried and tested techniques. My diversity of interests makes it difficult to write focused grant applications, but it allows me to qualify for a wider range of funding opportunities. I sometimes feel that I’m lurching around in the dark, but this approach has allowed me to make some significant contributions to my research field.

Are you a Jill or Jack of all trades? Or a master or mistress of a particular type of science?

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