Advice on Setting up a Laboratory: Where Old Equipment goes to Die

I count myself extremely fortunate that I inherited my lab space from a retiring faculty member. This researcher was extremely generous and left me a great deal of equipment and supplies that literally saved me thousands of dollars in start-up funds. This was in contrast to the horror stories that I heard whispered in the hallways as a grad student and post-doc about retiring professors leaving archaic equipment and garbage behind for unsuspecting new faculty.

After I had a handle on the physical aspects of the lab space, it was time to honestly assess the pieces of scientific equipment, reagents, plastic ware, etc. that were in the lab. This involved using a triage method of sorts and deciding whether items were: i) currently useful to my research program, ii) potentially useful to my research program in the future, or iii) likely not to be of any use to me now or ever.

The easiest group to identify were items in category iii; these were either obviously broken or expired items, items that I would never use, and in some cases unidentified items whose purpose remained a mystery to me. If it was broken or expired it went into the trash or chemical waste for disposal. Mystery items and items that I would never use were put into a pile to be dealt with later. It’s very important to be realistic about what you might use and not to save things for a rainy day. Chances are you’ll never use that piece of weird equipment and it will take up valuable lab space acting as a very effective dust collector.

I gathered up the pieces of equipment that I did not need and placed them on an empty benchtop. I then asked the departmental administrative assistant to send an email to all faculty members and teaching staff indicating that I had free pieces of equipment available on a first-come, first-served basis. My colleagues appreciated free items that were useful to them, and I was happy to clear the stuff out of my lab, so it was a win for everyone. Each year I purge the lab in this manner and get rid of items that are needlessly taking up space.

I had to take some time to assess whether other items fell into category i or ii. If I thought it was something that I would definitely use or that I could envision using in the next 2-3 years then I kept it. If not, it joined the items I would never use pile. I am still using many category i and ii items in the lab today including a PCR machine, light banks, vortexer, etc. Other items I used for the first couple of years that I was here until they ceased to function, or until I could afford to upgrade to a more convenient or efficient model. This included a centrifuge, pH meter, balance, and several sets of pipetmen. When I replaced this equipment, I first offered the old equipment to newer faculty members in an attempt to pay it forward.

It is really worth your time to take inventory before you purchase any items for your new lab. This will reduce the chance of you purchasing redundant equipment and is also cost effective. Doing this kind of inventory also serves to make you very aware of what you have, what you don’t have, and helps you to prioritize future lab purchases.

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