Advice on Setting up a Laboratory: Physical Space

Training to do science in graduate school and as a post-doc is great for teaching you how to conceptualize and do science, but it’s somewhat terrifying to be hired into a tenure-track position and realize that you now need to set-up your lab. It needs to be a functional space where excellent research can be conducted. Where to start?

It’s helpful to start from the ground up and take a good, hard look at the physical space of the laboratory that you’ve been given. This might be a laboratory of your very own or bench space in a shared, open-concept lab. Hopefully you’ve already been successful in negotiating a decent sized space in an attractive location (i.e. space that is not the size of a closet, actually has some natural light, and isn’t too far from your office).

It sounds very simple, but one of the first things I did in my laboratory was to spend a morning taking dimension measurements of bench tops, alcoves, cubbies, shelving, floor space, doorways, and other surfaces. While this may seem like a lot of time to invest up front, it pays off when you are trying to determine whether that new fridge that you want to order will actually fit in that particular corner of your lab and whether you can get it through the door.

It’s also worth determining whether any of the fixtures in your lab can be moved as this increases the flexibility of space. Are cabinets on casters? Can the height of shelves be modified? Can shelving or cabinets be moved and remounted elsewhere? For example, I relocated a pair of cabinets from one location to another in the lab in order to fit a Laminar flow hood; this had the added plus of giving me more shelf space in an area of the lab where it would be useful. Some fixtures can’t be moved (e.g. safety showers and eye wash stations, sinks, gas lines, electrical outlets, built-in benches, etc.) and will therefore impose some limitations on the space unless you are willing to spend some money to relocate them.

Now that you have a handle on the physical space within the lab, the next step is to take stock of what is in it. If you are getting a lab space that is part of a new building or a recent renovation the space may actually be empty, but many of us have inherited our lab space (and therefore equipment and materials) from a previous occupant.

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